Apple references security in Snow Leopard announcement

Share this article:
With Monday's announcement that Apple's next Mac OS X version, Snow Leopard, is due out in September, the company posted to its website a slew of features that the new platform will contain.

And with that came a rarely seen acknowledgment from Apple regarding security.

"Innocent-looking files downloaded over the internet may contain malicious applications, or malware, in disguise," a page on Apple's website said. "The Mac is designed with built-in technologies that provide protection against malicious software and security threats right out of the box...However, since no system can be 100 percent immune from every threat, anti-virus software may offer additional protection."

The page also lists a number of Mac OS X security features, such as sandboxing, which helps prevent what a malicious program can do on a user's PC, and Execute Disable, which can safeguard memory if an attack occurs.

This appears to be Apple's first public reference to security since December, when it published -- and then subsequently removed -- a support document encouraging Mac OS X users to use anti-virus software.

Mac security solutions provider Intego said in a memo Wednesday that the more information that Apple publishes on security, the more informed customers will be.

"Apple has finally recognized what Intego has been saying for years: that Macs are not immune to viruses and malware," Intego CEO Laurent Marteau said.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based computing giant often bears criticism from the security industry over what they perceive to be brash claims concerning the security of Mac OS X versus Windows. Others have questioned how effectively Apple responds to vulnerabilities.

In a blog post last week, security analyst Rich Mogull of Securosis listed five suggestions for Apple.

They included appointing a chief security officer, adopting a secure software development program and creating a security response team.

An Apple spokeswoman did not return a call for comment.

Meanwhile, earlier this week, security firm ParetoLogic disclosed a new Mac malware variant disguised as porn.


Share this article:

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

Firefox 32 feature could cut undetected malware downloads 'in half'

Mozilla plans to introduce a feature in Firefox 32 that, based on preliminary testing, could cut the amount of undetected malware downloads in half.

EFF asks court to find NSA internet spying a violation of Fourth Amendment

EFF asks court to find NSA internet spying ...

Complete with a colorful graphic, the EFF showed a federal court how the NSA essentially runs a digital dragnet that can pick up innocent Americans.

Study: Asian Android users at higher risk of malware exposure

Cheetah Mobile's new study showed that Asian Android users have a two to three times greater risk of downloading malware onto their devices.