April's Patch Tuesday from Microsoft includes another Internet Explorer patch

Share this article:
Microsoft patches 18 Internet Explorer vulnerabilities, closes an actively exploited hole in Office
Microsoft patches 18 Internet Explorer vulnerabilities, closes an actively exploited hole in Office

Microsoft is readying nine patches to be released Tuesday as part of the software giant's monthly security update.

Two of the nine fixes address vulnerabilities rated "critical," meaning they could be exploited to execute remote code, while the remaining seven patches attend to flaws deemed "important," according to an advance notification from Microsoft.

Security observers eyed one of the critical fixes, "Bulletin 1," as the most pressing because it involves vulnerabilities in all supported versions (6-10) of Internet Explorer (IE). Security weaknesses in browsers are preferred vectors of attack for cyber criminals because often they can be successful by a victim merely visiting an infected web page.

Andrew Storms, director of security operations at nCircle, which recently was acquired by Tripwire, suspects one of the IE flaws being plugged was discovered last month at the Pwn2Own hacker contest at the CanSecWest show in British Columbia.

The update's remaining patches, address issues in Windows, Office, Server Software and Security Software. The update is due out around 2 p.m. EST on Tuesday.

Share this article:

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

Report: UK police push for required mobile phone PWs

The Metropolitan Police have reportedly lobbied for two years to enact the standard.

JPMorgan Chase customers targeted in massive phishing campaign

JPMorgan Chase customers targeted in massive phishing campaign

Roughly 500,000 emails have been sent out so far as part of a massive multifaceted phishing campaign targeting customers of JPMorgan Chase.

Study: Organizations lack training, budget to thwart insider threats

Study: Organizations lack training, budget to thwart insider ...

Of the 355 IT and security professionals surveyed, a majority indicated that they were ill-equipped to thwart a possible insider threat.