CloudFlare details more than 50 requests for user data

Cloudflare issued its newest transparency report on Tuesday, which covers the first half of 2015.
Cloudflare issued its newest transparency report on Tuesday, which covers the first half of 2015.

CloudFlare issued its transparency report for the first half of 2015 on Tuesday, which detailed the more than 50 requests it received from government for user information.

The company, which prevents malicious web traffic through a cloud-based service, received 12 subpoena requests and 50 court order requests, CloudFlare wrote. Ten of the subpoena requests were complied with and affected 139 domains and 12 accounts. CloudFlare also complied with all but one of its received court orders, which includes any order issued by a judge or magistrate. The 48 answered requests accounted for 2,120 domains and 96 accounts.

The company further clarified specific request types, including search warrants, of which it received three requests pertaining to 127 domains and eight accounts. No wiretap orders were received, and only one pen register/trap and trace order was received. It impacted two domains and one account.

“It is CloudFlare's overriding privacy principle that any personal information you provide to us is just that: personal and private,” the company wrote in the report. “We will not sell, rent or give away any of your personal information without your consent. Our respect for our customer's privacy applies with equal force to commercial and to law enforcement requests.”

Although most request type numbers mirrored prior reports, court orders had a notable uptick. In the last half of 2014, CloudFlare had only received 24 requests and in the first half it received 22.

The company clarified that it never turns over its SSL keys or customers' SSL keys to law enforcement, and it has never terminated a customer account or removed content due to political pressure.

“If CloudFlare were asked to do any of the above, we would exhaust all legal remedies, in order to protect its customers from what we believe are illegal or unconstitutional requests,” the report said.

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