Connecticut student privacy bill quashed by House committee

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A state privacy bill meant to protect the personally identifiable information of Connecticut students was rejected by a Connecticut House committee this week.

Originally passed by the Education Committee on a 22-10 vote, Senate Bill 423 would have prevented the release of scores related to a military-aptitude test, as well as other information, to a third party such as military recruiting services, according to a report by The New Haven Register.

The bill was rejected once it made its way to the Connecticut House of Representatives' Veterans Affairs Committee.

Scores related to the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, which helps armed forces recruiters assess potential prospects for the military, can now be released without parental consent, or student consent if they are 18 and older.

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