Consumers taking their business elsewhere after a hack, Centrify survey

Two-thirds of survey respondents said they were likely to cease doing business with organizations that have been hacked.
Two-thirds of survey respondents said they were likely to cease doing business with organizations that have been hacked.

A new study examines consumer attitudes toward corporate hacking and companies should take heed.

That's because of the 800 consumers polled in the U.S. by the Centrify Consumer Trust Survey, two-thirds said they were likely to cease doing business with organizations that have been hacked.

While financial institutions, medical entities and government agencies received favorable grades for how they deal with hacks, retail businesses and travel sites were perceived less favorably and membership and hospitality businesses polled worst.

Hacking is accepted as inevitable, the study found, with three-quarters of those surveyed accepting it as the norm. However, most consumers still hold businesses accountable. Two-thirds of respondents said they were at least somewhat likely to stop doing business after a hack.

At first glance the majority of respondents expressed that they were somewhat satisfied with the way a hack was handled. But only 47 percent of respondents were very satisfied.

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