Defendant pleads guilty in brokerage keylogger case

Share this article:

One of three conspirators in a computer-fraud scheme that used trojans to steal funds from brokerage accounts has pleaded guilty to federal charges in New York.

Alexey Mineev of Hampton, N.H. pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and one count of money laundering. Two others individuals were indicted in November: Aleksey Volynskiy of New York and Alexander Bobnev of Volgogard, Russia. But only Mineev and Volynskiy, both naturalized U.S. citizens, have been captured.

The three men installed keylogging trojans onto victim's computers, according to an indictment, which did not describe how they accomplished this. When victims logged onto their brokerage accounts, their credentials were stolen and used by the defendants to access the accounts.

Bobnev transferred the money to one of several accounts set up by Mineev and Volynskiy, and they withdrew the money and wired it to Russia, according to the indictment.

Mineev faces two years in prison and must return $112,000 that was made from the scheme. Charges still are pending for Volynskiy, and Bobnev has not yet been apprehended in Russia.

 

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of SC Magazine to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

TOP COMMENTS

More in News

Adobe exploit used to spread Dyre credential stealer

Adobe exploit used to spread Dyre credential stealer

Users running vulnerable Adobe software could be in danger of having credentials for Bitcoin websites stolen.

Staples is investigating a potential issue involving credit card data

Staples is investigating a potential issue involving credit ...

The company said it is investigating a potential issue involving credit card data and that customers are not responsible for fraudulent activity on cards if an issue is discovered.

Skills set a priority over legacy prejudices, experts say

Skills set a priority over legacy prejudices, experts ...

Cybersecurity expert Winn Schwartau and Robert Clark, a cyber law attorney at the Army Cyber Institute, discussed issues around hiring in the information security industry.