Spying on iPhones a cinch with 'Su-A-Cyder' homegrown malware kit

Mi3Security Chief Architect for R&D Chilik Tamir recently demonstrated at Black Hat Asia how his homegrown malware kit called Su-A-Cyder could generate apps to spy on iPhones.
Mi3Security Chief Architect for R&D Chilik Tamir recently demonstrated at Black Hat Asia how his homegrown malware kit called Su-A-Cyder could generate apps to spy on iPhones.

If you've got a hankering for spying on Apple iPhones and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) isn't around to apply its newly found way of cracking the devices, Mi3Security Chief Architect for R&D Chilik Tamir recently demonstrated at Black Hat Asia how his homegrown malware kit called Su-A-Cyder could do just that.

With an unlocked iPhone, a PC and a decrypted app in hand, a malfeasant could use Su-A-Cyder to create spyware. Tamir released a video that showed the automation tool being used to create a malevolent Skype app that ultimately steals a phone's data.

During his Black Hat presentation, Tamir noted that Apple requires all code for iOS-based apps be “properly signed with an Apple-provided certificate.” So replacing code, patching applications and repackaging iOS apps simply “should not be possible.” However, as the researcher's demo showed, Su-A-Cyder is not only able to introduce malware features into an app, but it also can generate and resign new signing certificates, eventually using the original app as a host, so all appears to be in order.

The ability to sidestep Apple's safeguards, of course, opens a whole host of security concerns for both enterprises and individuals,Tamir noted in his Black Hat presentation.

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