UPCOMING WEBCASTS

Cloudy with a chance of flaws

Any number of industry pundits have noted the prevalence of major vulnerabilities this year, especially when accounting for Heartbleed, Shellshock and POODLE.

Previous Webcasts

Mobile madness

More and more corporate activities are being undertaken by employees depending on iPhones, iPads, laptops and other mobile devices.

Preparing for the inevitable

With zero-day attacks still reaping rewards for cyber criminals, they show few signs of waning. And, preparation for them is all but impossible.

Leveraging big data governance

Managing the vast volumes of data -- both customer and corporate -- on which most organizations depend for their day-to-day operations and long-term growth of their businesses always has been challenging.

Protecting your core assets

Maintaining even the most basic IT security controls is becoming more challenging for organizations as cloud computing, mobile and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) reshape the average corporate network and how it is used.

Wanted: Buy-in from the board

As massive breaches occur with more frequency, consumers have become increasingly anxious about just how large retail, financial and other companies with which they're dealing are protecting their personal information.

Unlocking the conundrum of advanced evasion techniques (AETs)

As various industry organizations, such as the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) in Finland, work with numerous IT security vendors and other experts to figure out the countless vulnerabilities that can allow advanced evasion techniques (AETs) to sneak through networks, organizations plagued by AETs are facing their own, more immediate pressures to come to terms with these rising attacks.

Make It Stop! Protecting Corporate Data Assets Against Breach

SCMagazine's 2014 Data Breach Survey shows companies are taking steps to raise security awareness and investing in IT security and risk management practices but given the number of breaches and other high profile cyber crimes that have occurred more recently, are they doing enough?

Compliance gets you on the road to security

Today there is a veritable alphabet soup of data security standards and laws governing how companies must operate. But, most agree, compliance is more of a first step to security rather than an assurance of security itself.

Battling savvy cyber thieves

The methods cyber attackers use to infiltrate networks are endless. There is no doubt that the more sophisticated bad guys looking to steal specific data have enlisted surreptitious ways to achieve their ends.

Fighting APTs

Fighting APTs

With simple viruses and Trojans were all the rage, life was simpler for the average CSO. Now, threats of all types abound and the methods cyber attackers enlist to infiltrate networks have only become more varied, often a bit more sophisticated and most assuredly more frequent. One of the most problematic has proven to be APTs.

Maximizing your SIEM tool

Today's networks are far-reaching and consist of many disparate configurations - from basic local area networks to cloud environments to mobile. Obviously, the need to know what's going on is imperative. SIEM tools - which gather, analyze and present information to offer a holistic view of an organization's information technology - have been around for about a decade. There have been a lot of changes in what constitutes a SIEM product, but the challenge for many has been what can be done with the logs and reports so as to be made aware of anomalies that may indicate threats.

Mobile and cloud: The Big Data security conundrum

Mobile and cloud: The Big Data security conundrum

Back when mainframes ruled the corporate computing environment it was far easier to manage critical data. After all, most folks used "dumb" terminals. However, distributed computing quickly made its way into the enterprise, so now, computers with more storage power than ever have become commonplace. Data, as a result, has become widely distributed. And, with the rapid adoption of cloud computing, that data is even more widely distributed - and a challenge to control. The explosion in mobile device use, too, has introduced more stored data. Given the swiftness of these changes and the seeming ubiquitous reliance on cloud storage and myriad mobile devices, just how can all this data be controlled and secured? We learn more.

Ready or not, BYOD demands safeguards

Ready or not, BYOD demands safeguards

No one can argue that the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement is changing the way workers undertake business activities. Most employees nowadays are tethered to a mobile device of some sort that leaves them checking email or communicating with someone for work at any given hour of any given day. This always-on mentality, then, certainly should be informing how executives ensure that their companies' risk management and security plans are updated and managed. However, most organizations are still trying to get their hands around just how employees are using mobile devices and for what tasks, according to a recent SC Magazine survey that saw participation from 220 readers.

20/20 Webcast: Keeping data safe in the cloud

20/20 Webcast: Keeping data safe in the cloud

Cloud services have become ubiquitous. Many organizations, though, having embraced their various benefits, sometimes have overlooked some of their problems - including those that can arise because of security weaknesses, as a recent SC Magazine survey, which was sponsored by McAfee, has further affirmed. There are a slew of worries respondents noted as top of mind - from data loss, access control, incident monitoring and endpoint security to shared technology risks with customers, service provider access to data and cloud account hijacking. Add to these operational concerns, issues around keeping compliant with regulatory mandates or signing and monitoring service-level agreements and stress levels for information security professional like you can skyrocket. Through this latest 20/20 we hope to assuage some of your concerns by arming you with sound and practical steps you can take to address security-related problems in the cloud and ultimately keep your organization and its sensitive information safe from harm.

Big days ahead for Big Data security

Big days ahead for Big Data security

Some industry stats show that about 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day. Even more astounding is that about 90 percent of this data was just created in just the last two years, according to IBM experts. The phenomenon of Big Data is here and not only does it mean that organizations have much to sift through to determine just what information is critical and calls for protections, but also that they can leverage some of this data to help them in their fight against the attackers who are trying to seize it. We talk to RSA experts to find out just how Big Data is transforming security and privacy requirements and what this means for organizations' security and risk management plans going forward.

20/20 Webcast: Big days ahead for Big Data security

20/20 Webcast: Big days ahead for Big Data security

Some industry stats show that about 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day. Even more astounding is that about 90 percent of this data was just created in just the last two years, according to IBM experts. The phenomenon of Big Data is here and not only does it mean that organizations have much to sift through to determine just what information is critical and calls for protections, but also that they can leverage some of this data to help them in their fight against the attackers who are trying to seize it. We talk to RSA experts to find out just how Big Data is transforming security and privacy requirements and what this means for organizations' security and risk management plans going forward.

20/20 Webcast: Stop data from going for a (thumb) drive

20/20 Webcast: Stop data from going for a (thumb) drive

Join us for a 20/20 webcast during which we talk to Chris Merritt about the challenges associated with these pervasive storage devices, and what steps your company can take to prevent the misuse - whether inadvertent or malicious - of data transfer.

The new normal - APTs

The new normal - APTs

There's a saying in the security business these days: Either you've been compromised or you don't know you've been compromised. As advanced adversaries continually penetrate organizations of all sizes to serve persistent threats that siphon data over a period of days, weeks, months and even years, victims must learn how to spot the attack and decide their next action. Should they force the miscreants out the door, monitor their activities a bit or take another option? For certain, building up security mechanisms that make it harder for these attackers to lob APTs at their organization is a must, but just what should this entail. We learn more.

APTs: The role of third-party apps

APTs: The role of third-party apps

Once an anomaly with which government agencies and some private companies that work with them had to deal, advanced persistent threats (APTs) are becoming a considerable problem for a spate of larger organizations and public entities alike. Now, it is no longer a matter of if sophisticated cyber criminals have infiltrated your systems, say many experts, but when they hit and for how long they've lingered.

Guarding against a data breach

Guarding against a data breach

Our sixth-annual data breach survey, which polled IT security pros in the U.S. as well as those working in the U.K. and Australia, yielded interesting insights on how organizations are dealing with today's data security threats. And, while the majority of pros are optimistic about the steps they're taking to safeguard critical data from getting lost or stolen, many still cite plenty of challenges with which they must contend.

20/20 Webcast: Cyber crime targets

20/20 Webcast: Cyber crime targets

Cyber criminals are evolving their tactics to take advantage of organizations' most obvious weakness: employees. As such, organizations must be concerned more than ever before about how users interact with the technologies on which they rely everyday. Mobile devices, email, third-party apps, web browsers and more, all have major risks associated with them. And one wrong interaction with any one of these can lead to major attacks on critical and intellectual property, as well as overall brands and bottom lines

Next year's problems

Next year's problems

As we approach the end of 2008, we re-examine some of the major happenings of the year. What were some of the major breaches? Was key legislation enacted that made an impact? How are companies contending with customer demands regarding security and regulators' requirements on safeguarding critical data? What do all these happenings mean for 2009? And, more importantly, what do our readers think? We find out.

Sign up to our newsletters