Google's AdID a rumored replacement for third-party cookies

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Google is developing a more anonymous means of tracking users' browsing habits for data-hungry advertisers.

The technology, rumored to be called “AdID,” would reportedly serve as a replacement for third-party cookies for the tech giant.

A source familiar with Google's work on the project revealed details about AdID to USA Today, which broke the news on Tuesday. The outlet refrained from identifying the source as Google had not yet made its plans public.

AdID would serve as an “anonymous identifier” and an alternative to third-party cookies – text-based files stored in users' web browsers that keep track of their browsing habits as they peruse the web. Google is expected to reach out to government bodies, consumer groups and industry participants about its plans In the next few weeks and months, the article said.

On Wednesday, a Google spokesperson emailed a statement to SCMagazine.com regarding the AdID rumors. 

According to the statement, technology along the lines of AdID could be a ways off from widescale implementation, if Google does, in fact, have something in the works.   

“We believe that technological enhancements can improve users' security while ensuring the web remains economically viable,” the statement said. “We and others have a number of concepts in this area, but they're all at very early stages.”

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