Google's new Chome browser comes with privacy option

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Google has introduced its latest version of Chrome, and claims to have enhanced speed and privacy features.

The principal tweak to Google Chrome related to privacy is the ability to eliminate pictures of websites – that is, before when a "New Tab" page was opened, it was preloaded with graphical links to previous websites visited the most, recently saved websites and recently closed tabs. Up to nine  thumbnail images were displayed. That is now an option.

“The most requested feature from users was the ability to remove thumbnails from the New Tab page,” wrote Darin Fisher of the Google Chrome Team on the Google Chrome Blog. “Now you can finally hide that embarrassing gossip blog from the Most Visited section.”

Other improvements to “Chrome 2” include a full-screen mode that enables users to hide the title bar and the rest of the browser window; an autofill form that enables users to load previously entered information into fields automatically; greater stability, stemming from fixes of more than 300 bugs that had caused crashes; and increased speed due to a new version of WebKit and an update to Google's JavaScript engine, V8.

Current users will be automatically updated to the new version. New users can get the latest version here.

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