Hackers may have stolen South Carolina employees' data

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The personal information of thousands of South Carolina state employees may have been stolen by hackers.

How many victims? 5,600.

What type of personal information? Names, addresses, Social Security numbers and birth dates.

What happened? A computer containing the sensitive data of thousands of state employees, retirees, dependents and survivors who were covered by the state's Employee Insurance Program was infected by a virus that may have permitted hacker access. The breach was discovered Nov. 18, about 10 days after it began.

Details: The affected computer contained the records of about 800 people who are dead. 

Quote: "Obviously, this is a terrible situation, and we feel for all those whose privacy may have been compromised," said Rob Godfrey, a spokesman for the state Budget and Control Board.

What was the response? The board has mailed notification letters to affected individuals. In addition, officials hireda new director who is "committed to making sure that changes are implemented, quickly, so something like this never happens again," Godfrey said.

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division has been notified about the intrusion.

Source: Associated Press via aikenstandard.com, “Agency: Records of employees may have been breached,” Jan. 17, 2011.

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