Happy Hour Hot Links: Week of 7/22

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Every Friday, after the SC Magazine news team has taken a few spins around the interwebs, we post some security-related links that we found interesting. We hope you do too. If not, there's always next week.
  • Seven days from now, many of us will be at DefCon. Or the Vegas airport after a few days spent at Black Hat. How did you survive the "world's most hostile network?" Be careful.
  • While at the conference(s), don't take this (purposely) bad advice. In fact, do the opposite.
  • There are lots of shows like Black Hat, DefCon and RSA (Deadline alert!) to which to submit talks, but also lots of rejection. Here's a solid primer on how to best position your next pitch – and also how to best handle a rebuff.
  • Thomas Rid, a reader in war studies at King's College London, admits, somewhat surprisingly considering the scale of vulnerability, that there's never been a successful act of digital sabotage on the U.S. power grid. But if the government fails to take defense seriously, and keeps doing stuff like this, there soon will be.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration appears dedicated to weeding out vulnerabilities in medical devices and working with researchers on the disclosure process. This is good.
  • Companies still stink at protecting their websites. Here's help.
  • Like old photos of New York City like we do? Here's some cool shots from the Big Apple in the early 1970s. Pic 24 is a few blocks north of the SC Magazine offices.
  • And of course, RIP, Barnaby. 
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