Letter: Beware! Pirates at work

Share this article:

It's good to see the Government sit up and take note of the knock-on effects of music and film piracy following Andrew Gowers' intellectual property report. However, while tougher penalties should help drive down CD copying, a gaping hole has been left when it comes to business software piracy.

Recent figures from IDC indicate that more than a quarter of business software in the UK is being used illegally, equating to global industry losses in excess of £1 billion. A reduction in software piracy would not only increase tax revenue, but also generate jobs. Is this not also a serious issue for the country's economy?

Anti-piracy bodies such as the BSA enforce strict regulations on companies that fail to comply with software licensing guidelines, and court cases are not uncommon as a result. Ironically, assessing the software licensing status of a corporate network is a straightforward process. The Government has taken a step in the right direction for the piracy problem as a whole. However, businesses must act now to avoid falling prey to the software pirates.

Matt Fisher, Vice-president, Centennial Software.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of SC Magazine to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

A threat analysis from Dell SecureWorks CTU says that CryptoWall has picked up where its famous sibling left off.

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical info

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical ...

A professor of ethical hacking at City College San Francisco came forward to clarify that he did not demonstrate hacking a medical center's server in a class.

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm RAT

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm ...

FireEye analyzed the hacking group's use of the malware, dubbed the "Dark Edition" of BlackWorm.