Massive hacker attack continues

Share this article:

At least 282,000 web pages have been hit by the latest SQL injection attack on web servers, according to Panda Security. And the number of seemingly legitimate web pages affected is growing.

Ryan Sherstobitoff, chief corporate evangelist at Panda Security, claimed that the attack's effect is well understood. Hackers inject SQL code in web pages by taking advantage of a vulnerability in Microsoft's Internet Information Services (IIS) web server.

“When someone clicks on a compromised page, the attack checks for five different [Microsoft] vulnerabilities on the user's PC, and if it finds one, redirects them to a malicious website that can install identity-stealing malware,” Sherstobitoff told SCMagazineUS.com Friday. The pages typically do not show any signs of being compromised, he added.

But Patrik Runald, security response manager at Finnish anti-virus firm F-Secure, the attack does not use vulnerabilities in IIS; rather, it is focused on exploiting ways to inject malicious code onto served pages.

“We looked at the IIS logs of the exploited sites, and it appears that the problem comes from servers that have not properly sanitized their code,” he told SCMagazineUS.com.

To alleviate the problem, administrators should make sure that all server patches are up to date and that servers are hardened, Runald said.

“It's important to filter for the malicious code,” he said.

 

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of SC Magazine to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

A threat analysis from Dell SecureWorks CTU says that CryptoWall has picked up where its famous sibling left off.

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical info

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical ...

A professor of ethical hacking at City College San Francisco came forward to clarify that he did not demonstrate hacking a medical center's server in a class.

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm RAT

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm ...

FireEye analyzed the hacking group's use of the malware, dubbed the "Dark Edition" of BlackWorm.