National Security

Audit doubts FBI's ability to combat cyberthreats

By

The FBI must bolster its information sharing and cybersecurity expertise to effectively investigate and combat the most serious cyber intrusions, according to a new audit.

White House cybersecurity coordinator expected to keynote

White House cybersecurity coordinator expected to keynote

By

Scheduled to hit the stage on Nov. 11 at 4:30 p.m. for an SC World Congress' keynote address, Howard Schmidt, cybersecurity coordinator and special assistant to President Obama, plans to discuss progress of the U.S. National Cybersecurity Strategy and how he and his staff will help to propel it forward. Outlining the myriad IT security challenges that both the public and private sectors face, Schmidt also plans to highlight just some of the efforts underway to keep the nation's infrastructure up and running. SC World Congress Data Security Conference and Expo is taking place Nov. 10 and 11 at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers in in New York City.

Worries grow over safety of online transactions

By

The number of consumers seriously concerned about the security of online transactions is at its highest level in three years, according to the latest Unisys Security Index, released Tuesday. In the biannual survey of 1,004 consumers, which measures how safe Americans feel regarding national, financial, internet and personal security, 20 percent of respondents were "extremely concerned" about shopping or banking online, up from 16 percent in September 2009. Another 23 percent said they are "very concerned." Meanwhile, identity theft and national security ranked as Americans' top worries, garnering serious concern from 64 and 65 percent of respondents, respectively. — AM

Bill could restrict funds for nations ignoring cybercrime

By

A new U.S. Senate bill would threaten countries with funding restrictions if they fail to properly address cybercrime within their boundaries.

TSA insider indicted on tampering charges

By

A former U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employee was indicted Wednesday for planting malicious code on a government server, which contained data about suspected terrorists that was used to screen airport workers, federal authorities said. Douglas James Duchak, 46, of Colorado Springs, Colo. was a data analyst at the TSA from 2004 to 2009. He carried out the scheme, which caused at least $5,000 in damages, after learning his employment would be terminated. If convicted, he faces up to 10 years in federal prison and a fine of up to $500,000. — AM

Sign up to our newsletters

POLL