New report urges security and privacy settings in networks

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Behind the rallying cry, “Privacy equals freedom,” Ontario's Information and Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian struck a partnership with Oracle to celebrate International Privacy Day: Jan. 28.

Together, they released a white paper, “Privacy and Security by Design: A Convergence of Paradigms,” which promotes the idea of incorporating the two concepts as the default settings in networked data systems and technologies. In addition, Cavoukian appeared in a promotional video that traced the evolution of privacy from the technological perspective.

“Why settle for one when you can have both?” she asked in a statement. “Security and privacy are integral to an organization's priorities, project objectives, design processes and planning operations.”

Cavoukian says the joint white paper represents the first attempt to explore the similarities between privacy and security from the aspect of how they complement each other. Stressing her office's educational mandate, the commissioner is encouraging organizations to embed both privacy and security into the architecture, design and construction of information processes and technologies.



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