Risk and Compliance Resource Center

Social media guidelines meet the real world

Share this article:
Devin Redmond, co-founder and CEO, Social iQ Networks
Devin Redmond, co-founder and CEO, Social iQ Networks

It wasn't long too long ago that most companies were on the fence when it came to engaging in social media.

However, a quick look at the surging adoption rates among the nation's largest companies should tell you that not only are social networks here to stay, but they have become a critical communication channel for business. If you haven't already accepted that fact, do it now and determine how best to make the social web safe and successful for your organization.

One of the first steps most companies now take when engaging in social media is to create a policy. In fact, a quick internet search will bring up a slew of articles calling for "improved social media policies" and training as the means for brands to move forward safely.

But while it's true, that a solid a social media policy is important, you're sadly mistaken if you think a social media policy by itself will protect your company, your brands and your reputation.  Even the best social media policy models won't work if there is no way to enforce them

A written policy that's misunderstood, forgotten, and ignored won't actually protect your organization or prevent costly and embarrassing incidents. Guidelines and training are essential, but alone, they're neither scalable nor consistently effective.  Real data from the Altimeter Group reflects the challenges in keeping policies and training up to date and top of mind. 

History has demonstrated time and again in other enterprise segments that products and technology are needed to automate, complement, and enforce policies.

Let's take a quick look at your organization's owned and branded social accounts, after all, if you can't protect those, you have little hope of making progress with your employee and partner owned social accounts. If you're business is like most large businesses, you've got tens if not hundreds of company branded social media properties spanning countless Facebook pages, Twitter accounts, YouTube Channels, LinkedIn Pages, Google+ pages, Pinterest accounts, and more. These include everything from accounts you own, to those managed by departments, subsidiaries, and product teams. Each represents a piece of communication infrastructure that you own, despite the fact that it's ‘consumerized', and you lack the visibility and policy controls to manage and secure it. 

What's more, you likely have dozens of apps installed and authorized for each account – from marketing suites and campaign tools to mobile apps like Twitter for iPhone or Facebook for Android. You also probably have dozens of employees and contractors, each with a mix of administrative access rights and publishing authorization, (the same holds true for each of your connected and authorized apps).

These challenges aren't new. We've seen them before in other areas of our communications infrastructure.  And we've used written policies to establish a baseline policy structure, and subsequently applied technology to automate and enforce its application.  

Take, for example, email.

Page 1 of 2
Share this article:
close

Next Article in Risk and Compliance Resource Center

Sign up to our newsletters

More in Risk and Compliance Resource Center

Why the world is not ready to share sensitive information

Why the world is not ready to share ...

Is there such a thing as an exchange of secure information in an insecure world?

Data breach numbers don't lie: How organizations can protect against accidental data loss

Data breach numbers don't lie: How organizations can ...

To effectively mitigate mobile risk, organizations should employ the same content security capabilities, and ideally leverage the same content policies and rules in mobile environments.

Understanding parallax and convergence to improve security

Understanding parallax and convergence to improve security

To address today's threats, companies require a high degree of convergent perspective, information expertise, and coordination between personnel and groups.