One in three Americans resort to risky behaviors to remember passwords, study

A Secure Auth study found  that 74 percent of respondents rely on means other than memorization to manage their online passwords.
A Secure Auth study found that 74 percent of respondents rely on means other than memorization to manage their online passwords.

Conventional password management is becoming so exasperating that 35 percent of Americans write their passwords down just to help remember them, according to a recent study.

Researchers at SecureAuth queried 1,022 individuals and found 74 percent of respondents rely on means other than memorization to manage online passwords.

When asked what they consider most annoying about online passwords, 29 percent of respondents said “keeping up with different password requirements across accounts” and 18 percent named “meeting complex password requirements.”

Another 15 percent of the respondents took issue with needing to change a password regularly while 12 percent were frustrated by "getting locked out for too many incorrect attempts."

Compromised weak credentials behind recent breaches underscore the need for stronger password management. SecureAuth Chief Technology Officer (CTO) Keith Graham told SCMagazine.com via emailed comments that users can take some steps to strengthen password protection and reduce their frustration.

“Use a common saying, movie quote or song lyric while adding a few capital letters and numbers to create a password that is easier to recall,” he said.

He also recommended users set up password managers for complex passwords users and don't reuse passwords across multiple sites.

“Even the strongest passwords need to be changed frequently,” Graham explained. “Where possible, enable two-factor authentication on any website or web-based application.”

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