Supreme Court to hear cases on police search of cell phone data

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While public scrutiny of police methods for collecting cell phone data ensues, the Supreme Court will hear two integral cases impacting law enforcement practices.

On Tuesday, the country's highest federal court will consider whether law enforcement should be required to have a warrant when searching the cell phones of arrested individuals.

According to a Sunday article in The New York Times, the two cases to be argued are Riley v. California, where a man was convicted of attempted murder after police searched his smartphone in 2009, and United States v. Wurie, where similar actions were carried out by police in Boston in 2007.

The Supreme Court is expected to determine how Fourth Amendment protections against “unreasonable searches and seizures,” pertain in today's connected environment, where most Americans have sensitive data stored on their mobile devices.

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