Democrats, Independents and Republicans agree that U.S. cyber policy is lacking, Long Island University’s Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling and Analysis found.
Democrats, Independents and Republicans agree that U.S. cyber policy is lacking, Long Island University’s Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling and Analysis found.

While Americans remain divided along party lines about top threats to U.S. national security and domestic policy, there is one issue where the right and left are in lockstep – the country's cybersecurity policy is insufficient, according to a poll from Long Island University's Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling and Analysis. 

When the poll, which covered a wide range of issues from cybersecurity to immigration, asked 486 registered voters 18-80 years old if the U.S. could defend itself against cyberattacks, both foreign and domestic, only 15 percent answered in the affirmative, while 49 percent said no. Democrats, Republicans and Independents were in accordance.

“Americans come together in their belief that our current cyber security is inadequate,” said LIU Political Science Professor Stanley B. Klein, director of the Hornstein Center, said in release.  “The American people overwhelmingly agree that we must do more in this critical area.”