Facebook said last week that an internal investigation found a Russian "troll farm" bought ads from the social media giant that and apparently planted them to influence the presidential election.
Facebook said last week that an internal investigation found a Russian "troll farm" bought ads from the social media giant that and apparently planted them to influence the presidential election.

After special counsel Robert Mueller produced a search warrant, Facebook handed over records associated with fake accounts that purchased and planted $100,000 worth of ads on behalf of Russian interests to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 

After issuing repeated denials, Facebook said last week that an internal investigation found a Russian "troll farm" bought ads from the social media giant that and apparently planted them, some in targeted markets, "to focus on amplifying divisive social and political messages across the ideological spectrum — touching on topics from LGBT matters to race issues to immigration to gun rights," company CSO Alex Stamos wrote in a blog post.

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The company's stated policy for law enforcement says Facebook will hand over information on basic subscriber records only with a valid subpoena in the course of "an official investigation," records pertaining to an account by not content under a court order, and stored contents under a "search warrant issued under the procedures described in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure or equivalent state warrant procedures upon a showing of probable cause."

The Wall Street Journal reported that Facebook shared copies of ads with Mueller's investigation as well as the criteria the accounts used to target the those ads.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told ABC News his panel was “requesting a lot more information from Facebook" since there are still "a lot of unanswered questions.”