The “right to be forgotten” ruling has turned out to be as unpopular as it is unwieldy with Google weighing in this week with a protracted statement to European regulators detailing the complications that are arising from attempting to comply with a court's May decision.

The internet search engine company, which received 12,000 petitions within hours of implementing a web request form, said that it must depend on information provided by the requester “without assurance beyond the requester's own assertions as to its accuracy.”

Google ran into problems early on when it began removing links to articles from the Guardian and other British news organizations. 

The company also noted that the difficult of dealing with different standards for privacy in EU member courts some of which publish rulings containing the full names of litigants while others “anonymise their rulings.”