While the dark web offers a haven for criminals and serves as inspiration for Hollywood blockbusters, it’s much more mundane in real life. Still, many businesses feed into the fallacies surrounding the dark side of the Internet, ultimately delaying their ability to protect employees and consumers.

Our industry really needs to shed some light on the largest misconceptions associated with the dark web. Equipped with these new insights, we can empower security pros to explore the dark web and gain knowledge that will strengthen their security posture. But before we can debunk any misconceptions, companies must first understand the basics.

The dark web resides on a portion of the Internet where communications and transactions are carried out anonymously. Separate networks like TOR, Blockchain DNS, I2P, and ZeroNet make up the dark web and have different access requirements and resources. Cybercriminals and threat actors typically use these networks to securely and secretly coordinate crime functions, and openly discuss terrorist tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs). The dark web also serves as a marketplace to buy or sell goods or services, such as credit card numbers, social security numbers, all manners of drugs, and stolen subscription credentials. It’s a long list.  

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