U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan attend the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court on Monday heard oral arguments in Van Buren v. United States, a computer crimes case whose verdict could significantly broaden or narrow the scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court on Monday heard oral arguments in Van Buren v. United States, a computer crimes case whose verdict could significantly broaden or narrow the scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), including whether members of the ethical hacking community could face federal penalties.

The high court’s future ruling may ultimately hinge on whether the justices agree with the U.S.’s interpretation of the statute – particularly how it defines when a person has criminally exceeded authorized access to a computer system, website or app. In that regard, several justices on both sides of the ideological spectrum expressed doubt or confusion regarding the federal government’s stance.

Please register to continue.

Already registered? Log in.

Once you register, you'll receive:

  • News analysis

    The context and insight you need to stay abreast of the most important developments in cybersecurity. CISO and practitioner perspectives; strategy and tactics; solutions and innovation; policy and regulation.

  • Archives

    Unlimited access to nearly 20 years of SC Media industry analysis and news-you-can-use.

  • Daily Newswire

    SC Media’s essential morning briefing for cybersecurity professionals.

  • Learning Express

    One-click access to our extensive program of virtual events, with convenient calendar reminders and ability to earn CISSP credits.