Google’s soon-to-be-released mobile operating system, Android L, will enable encryption by default to further protect users phone data, a report from The Washington Post revealed.

Android L, expected to be available soon as next month, takes Google’s data protection mechanisms a step further. While Android devices already offered encryption since 2011, the new mobile operating system will have the protection switched on by default so “only somebody who enters a device’s password will be able to see the pictures, videos and communications stored on those smartphones,” the outlet said.

The measure puts Google alongside Apple in its efforts to further protect customer data. Last week, Apple unveiled a new privacy policy, which asserted that devices running iOS 8 make use of encryption that locks device owner data away from both the company and police requesting information with warrants.