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States of Security

DeSantis says Russians hacked two Florida county election info in 2016

Following a briefing by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis confirmed that Russian hackers accessed election information in two of the state’s counties after successful spear phishing attempts, although the governor declined to name the counties at the behest of investigators. “I’m not allowed to name the counties.…

State of security: Oklahoma

Who’s in charge: State Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax Oklahoma’s voting standards came under some scrutiny for some Election Day practices that are considered unsecure potentially leaving their electoral process open to being hacked. The Center for American Progress called out the state for its practice of allowing absentee ballots to be returned electronically, the…

State of security: Iowa

Who’s in charge: Secretary of State Paul Pate, Director of Elections Dawn Williams Iowa uses nothing but paper ballots for all forms of voting, and then tabulates the votes with ballot marking technology or optical scanners. The auditing process has come under some criticism for a variety of perceived flaws, including its scope, which is limited to a…

State of security: Virginia

Who’s in Charge: Virginia Department of Elections, Chairman of the Board James B. Alcorn  Virginia officials have “remained vigilant” when it comes to threats to the state’s election infrastructure, According to the state’s Department of Elections website. They’re involved in the MS-ISAC pilot project and Virginia Information Technologies Agency is working with the Department of Homeland…

State of security: South Carolina

Who’s in charge: Executive Director of the S.C. State Election Commission Marci Andino The state’s 13,000 voting machines are old, no doubt, but officials believe they have at least one more election in them, according to a report in the Greenville News. But University of South Carolina Computer Science and Engineering Professor Duncan Buell said that given…

State of security: West Virginia

Who’s in charge: Secretary of State Mac Warner, Manager of Elections Donald Kersey West Virginia is attempting something unprecedented in this year’s 2018 elections: It will reportedly become the first state to allow residents and military members stationed abroad to vote in a general election using a mobile app. Overseas absentee voters will use this app, which is…

State of security: Alabama

Who’s in charge: Secretary of State John H. Merrill Although Secretary of State John H. Merrill has said his office is working closely with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to secure Alabama’s election systems, the specifics aren’t quite clear, a local newspaper wrote. The state does use paper ballots and follows the minimum cybersecurity…

State of security: Vermont

Who’s in charge: Secretary of State Jim Condes Vigilant Vermont officials in August discovered attempts by possible Russian operatives to target the state’s election system and alerted the Department of Homeland Security. “We did see the words ‘Russian Federation’ so we did feel that warranted us sending something to DHS,” Secretary of State Jim Condos…

State of security: New Mexico

Who’s in charge: Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver, Election Director Mandy Vigil From a security perspective, New Mexico is entering the 2018 elections from a position of strength. The Land of Enchantment relies solely on paper ballots, using only marking devices and optical scanners to record and tally the votes. Prior to the election, the state was to…

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