Every Friday, after the SC Magazine news team has taken a few spins around the interwebs, we post some security-related links that we found interesting. We hope you do too. If not, there’s always next week.

  • We’ll leave it to your Twitter feeds for a steady stream of news surrounding the pervasive NSA data collection and surveillance practices that were revealed this week – the latest is that the shadowy security and intelligence firm Palantir may be behind PRISM – but if we must, we’ll point you to Bruce Schneier’s excellent commentary on the overclassification of government programs and the importance of whistleblowers.
  • In overzealous prosecution news, the allegedly Anonymous-connected hacker who blew open the door on the Steubenville rape case could face more time behind bars than the actual rapists.
  • The Federal Trade Commission held a Mobile Security Forum this week, and perhaps the most interesting news to come out of it was that many of the panelists think mobile malware isn’t a big deal, at least here in the United States. They are much more concerned with those legitimate applications that secretly vacuum up personal data
  • Always refreshing to see infosec written about in long form. Vanity Fair has a new piece on cyber war, and it contains lots of great color.
  • Even with all of the talk around the importance of protecting critical infrastructure, nobody gets it, says Joe Weiss.
  • The resiliency of an IT system is difficult to calculate, unlike, for instance, a bridge. Gunnar Peterson is hopeful that can change.