Personal details from resumes and CVs from job seekers were exposed after a server belonging to a recruitment company that was a customer of Monster.com and others was left unprotected.

Monster.com which learned of the breach in August, did not initially alert potential victims to the exposure, contending that notification responsibly lay with the recruitment company that “owned” the data.

“Customers that purchase access to Monster’s data — candidate résumés and CVs — become the owners of the data and are responsible for maintaining its security,” Monster Chief Privacy Officer (CPO) Michael Jones said in a statement cited by TechCrunch. “Because customers are the owners of this data, they are solely responsible for notifications to affected parties in the event of a breach of a customer’s database.”

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