Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller will testify publicly about his recently completed Russia probe on July 17 after receiving subpoenas from the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees.

Mueller, who said during his only public appearance regarding his much-anticipated report last May that he didn’t want to testify before Congress, will face questions from both committees during separate hearings.

Despite Mueller’s reluctance, lawmakers have contended his testimony is key to understanding the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian operatives as well as obstruction of justice.

“Americans have demanded to hear directly from the Special Counsel so they can understand what he and his team examined, uncovered, and determined about Russia’s attack on our democracy, the Trump campaign’s acceptance and use of that help, and President Trump and his associates’ obstruction of the investigation into that attack,” according to a joint statement by House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, R-N.Y.

In a letter to the former special counsel, the two committee chairmen promised to work with him “to address legitimate concerns about preserving the integrity of [his] work.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Mueller’s testimony would help Americans more fully understand and rebuff threats to U.S. national security.  

“The Mueller Report revealed that the Russians waged a ‘sweeping and systematic’ attack on our elections, and America’s top intelligence and law enforcement officials have warned that the Russians will attack our elections again,” Pelosi said in a statement, chastising the president for calling it a hoax and suggesting in a recent interveiw “he would welcome Russian interference again.”