Product Information

Madge WLAN Probe 2

Vendor:

Madge

Quick Read

Strengths:

Simple connection, comprehensive pre-defined list of potential security vulnerabilities and easy, intuitive management.

Weaknesses:

Although the probes are standalone devices, users are advised to buy Madge's additional WLAN Probe Monitor when managing multiple units.

Verdict:

For companies that currently have no wireless security policy, the WLAN Probe 2 is an easily-deployed solution.

Rating Breakdown

SC Lab Reviews

Reviews from our expert team

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Performance:
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Ease of Use:
4/5

Summary

Madge claims the WLAN Probe 2 is the industry's first multi-band 802.11a/b/g and Bluetooth wireless intrusion detection probe. It is designed to secure network infrastructures by constantly scanning for any internal or external unauthorized wireless signals generated by 802.11a/b/g or Bluetooth-enabled devices. Each unit detects all wireless activity over an area of 45,000 square feet.

When the probe starts and is plugged into an Ethernet switch for the first time, it attempts to acquire an IP address from a local DHCP server. In the static-IP, address-based wireless infrastructure established for this test, the unit gave itself the static IP of 192.168.0.1. This address was already allocated, so we had to change it through the unit's intuitive set-up screen.

Management for the unit was accessed after running the setup CD on a PC located on the same subnet as the probe which fired up Madge's Discover utility automatically. This application found the probe unit and allowed us to change its attributes by clicking on it and, when using the program for the first time, entering a password to secure subsequent access.

Once the probe and software are running, you can view a rolling list of 1024 events. Among the events the system is designed to protect against are the creation of rogue APs, detection of new devices accessing the network and unauthorized conversations between local devices and remote APs.

When the probe is first started, its device list displays data about the devices it has discovered. This list, which can be imported or exported as a CSV file, is edited via the main configuration utility. To add a trusted device, we clicked the "add device" link and added the MAC address of the unit. We could then assign a memorable name to the device for ease of monitoring. Removing devices was achieved by the reverse process.

The unit has a browser-based HTML interface for administrators. For larger networks, Madge recommends that the probes are used with its WLAN Probe Monitor managed server.