Among the banes of existence for any human living in the 21st century is the need to periodically choose, change and remember numerous passwords, which partly explains why nearly 3 percent of computer users chose 123456 in 2019.

This according to , reports Teams ID.

So, if you fall into this category it may just be that time of the year to perhaps add to your list of New Year’s resolutions for 2020 to protect yourself from identity theft with an obscure password that could also be meaningful to your life. Selecting the most obvious words or numbers, as well as the same log-in for every website, is probably not the smartest approach to getting online.

“A strong password is defined as a password that is reasonably difficult to guess in a short period of time either through human guessing or the use of specialized software,” states Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData, which estimates almost 10 percent of people have used at least one of the 25 worst passwords on this year’s list. SplashData this year evaluated more than 5 million leaked passwords from mostly computer users in North America and Western Europe.

In the “not-so-brilliant-minds-think-alike” category, here are the most popular passwords, according to Teams ID: