December 01, 2008 | SC Media

Print Issue: December 01, 2008

Innovators for 2008

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This year, we took a look in the rearview mirror and observed a lot of convergence, but despite this trend interesting companies still flourish, says Peter Stephenson, technology editor.

Solutions to an old problem with a new, but solid twist

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Every now and then, some bright security pro has a flash of brilliance. Sometimes those flashes are hidden under mundane challenges. Passlogix’s new Shared Accounts Manager (SAM) is one of those products. The mundane problem is password sharing. There are many, what I refer to as, password carvers. These are intended to take passwords — mostly administrator passwords — and make them available to multiple users without compromising the password.

Worrisome forecast

Here’s what already is fairly obvious: The turn of the calendar to 2009 promises further sophistication from organized cybercriminals, forcing the private and public sector to act swiftly and decisively if they want to steer clear of potentially devastating data breaches.

Email security: Tumbleweed Communications (Axway)

Email security: Tumbleweed Communications (Axway)

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The big question I had for Tumbleweed was, “What is email security?” Over the past two years, as we have passed products through SC Labs, I have noticed that the vendor public relations folks who we talk to seem to have a hard time differentiating between the many aspects of threats associated with email.

NAC: Bradford Networks

NAC: Bradford Networks

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Bradford Networks is no stranger to these pages. An innovator from last year, Bradford has been reviewed a num­ber of times over the years, always doing well. This year we asked them how well their crystal ball last year worked as 2008 unfolded.

IT security reboot 2008

With each passing year, IT security extends its reach far beyond the realm of the technical. As a testament to the mainstreaming of digital defense, SC Magazine – with help from our Editorial Advisory Board – honored its most eclectic set of luminaries ever this year. Being recognized for their steadfast pursuit to securing cyberspace are two federal lawmakers, a businessman, a math prodigy, a traveling “salesman” and a computer science professor with a keen interest in internationalism. We also pored through hundreds of news stories to weed out the year’s top breaches, dumbest cybercrooks and CSOs to keep an eye on, plus a whole lot more.

Data Protection

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So far, we have been concerned with tools that manage security and move information around. This category addresses the data itself. Data is, after all, the reason we implement security in the first place. Protecting the infrastructure and protecting the data both are necessary to ensure that our valuable information is not compromised.

Access Control

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This year our biggest product category was access control. This seems right because as the enterprise morphs into a ubiquitous environment – with few if any borders – there needs to be a way to control who can access it and who cannot. With such challenges as cloud computing and SaaS, that is a bigger job than it may appear on the surface. In fact, it is a bigger job than last year.

Wireless Security: AirMagnet

Wireless Security: AirMagnet

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Wireless, is it? Everything is going wireless – well almost everything. That, in itself, poses a challenge for a wireless security company, such as this innovator. It also offers big opportunities and AirMagnet has identified and addressed them.

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