Product Information

Radmin Remote Administrator

Vendor:

Famatech LLC

Quick Read

Strengths:

Simple and fast, and it works with Windows 95/98 as well.

Weaknesses:

: Only supports TCP/IP.

Verdict:

: It sets out to provide fast remote control services, and it succeeds.

Rating Breakdown

SC Lab Reviews

Reviews from our expert team

Features:
Documentation:
Value for Money:
Performance:
Support:
Ease of Use:
4/5

Summary

Radmin Remote Administrator is a remote control system, pure and simple. It doesn't have administration tools or inventories, scripting languages, or the ability to distribute files to multiple servers in one shot. However, it has the ability to copy files to individual servers.

It is simple, uncomplicated and fast. The client program provides access to the Windows GUI at the target server and offers the option of using a telnet session. The telnet option may seem unattractive, since many administrators will have disabled Windows telnet server, but it is possible to have a "telnet" session with the Radmin server running on the target machine even though the Windows telnet service is stopped. The session is encrypted in the same way as the graphical interface, so although an ordinary telnet client can attempt to connect to the Radmin service if it knows the port number, it will not establish a session.

It is possible to change the default port numbers, and we certainly recommend changing these values as a security precaution.

Radmin uses 128-bit encryption and passwords to help ensure secure communications during remote control sessions, and each server must be running the Radmin server software before any connections can happen. If the remote user is logged on as a member of a domain, then the user's local security settings are used for authentication. The server can be configured to accept connections only from specified IP addresses and subnets.

We recommend doing this for better security wherever possible. The Radmin server can be configured as a service that starts with Windows or as a stand-alone program to be run as required. This flexibility allows administrators to arrange their remote control options to suit individual circumstances, perhaps by running it as a service on critical servers, and a stand-alone program on others.

The system can run over a local network or across the internet. It is restricted to using TCP/IP for communications between machines, which may restrict its use, but it will be suitable in most networks. It can be set up to use direct modem connections between machines, but you must have installed and enabled the Dial Up Networking features on both systems, specifying TCP/IP.