Law enforcement is also required to permanently and timely delete any information and data collected from any party not specified in the court order.
Law enforcement is also required to permanently and timely delete any information and data collected from any party not specified in the court order.

The New Hampshire House unanimously approved a bill restricting warrantless stingray surveillance.

The state's House Bill 474 received the bipartisan support of all the state representatives and the bill mandates that the devices can't be used without  the individuals, informed consent, or a detailed probable cause warrant, or a judicially-recognized exception to the warrant requirement, according to the bill.

Law enforcement is also required to permanently and timely delete any information and data collected from any party not specified in the court order.

The bill is meant to clamp down on the warrant-less deployment of the surveillance device and also states that anyone who violates the provision will be charged with a class A misdemeanor and may be fined up to $10,000. The act is set to take effect January 1, 2018.

Similar legislation is becoming more common across the nation as knowledge of unregulated Stingray use becomes more mainstream.

Earlier this month, a pair of New York City Council members proposed a law that would require the NYPD to disclose and evaluate the impact of the surveillance technologies it uses.