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Big Data

2.2 billion emails found in new Collection data dumps

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The German firm Heise Security has found 2.2 billion email addresses and associated passwords, which it is labeling Collection 2-5, available for free on the web. These credentials were found in data caches similar to the Collection 1 data dump that was exposed in mid-January and found to contain 773 million unique emails amid 600GB…

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Double exposure: 24 million loan records also exposed on open Amazon S3 bucket

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The original mortgage and credit documents involved in the 24 million Elasticsearch data breach that was revealed earlier this week also have been found residing in an open Amazon S3 bucket by the cyber researcher behind the original discovery. Bob Diachenko told TechCrunch, which worked with him on the original investigation, that more digging was…

24 million credit and mortgage records exposed on Elasticsearch database

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An open Elasticsearch database has again been found this time exposing 24.3 million mortgage and credit reports. Independent cybersecurity researcher Bob Diachenko said he found the 51GB of optical character recognition recorded pieces data earlier this month using public search engines like Shodan and Censys. The records contained very sensitive PII including Social Security numbers,…

Plans include an open standard that would shrink users' dependency on passwords.

Biometrics and AI firm team up for first U.S. biometric database amidst criticism

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Biometrics firm SureID and AI-startup firm Robbie.AI are teaming up to launch the first U.S. biometric database. SureID has a nationwide network of fingerprint enrollment kiosks while Robbie.AI uses technology to authenticate using AI-based facial recognition and behavioral prediction that could be combined to create a nationwide biometric databased for consumer focused initiatives, according to…

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Apple’s China-based iCloud data center raises privacy, human rights fears

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Human rights activists are concerned that the Chinese government’s regulation requiring that Apple host its citizen’s iCloud accounts on servers in China could make it easier for that nation to track down dissenters. To comply with this regulation Apple has opened a data center for its Chinese account holders that uses the state-owned firm Guizhou…

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