Critics of the bill say that equipment makers would lose control over the integrity of their products' security.
Critics of the bill say that equipment makers would lose control over the integrity of their products' security.

A bill before the Vermont Senate that compels original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to reveal their proprietary source code to independent repair shops could pose a risk to the security of some equipment.

“We understand the intention of this legislation is to provide consumers with the freedom and flexibility to fix everyday consumer devices, such as smartphones, tablets, televisions and computers,” Security Industry Association (SIA) Government Relations Manager Joe Hoellerer will testify Wednesday before the Senate Committee on Economic Development, Housing and General Affairs considering S. 180, the Vermont Fair Repair Act.

“Malfunctions can cause real, physical harm. We must enable manufacturers to ensure the efficacy and integrity of their products,” said Hoellerer, who calls the legislation burdensome for manufacturers. “By placing intricate repair information into the possession of uncertified independent repair providers, S. 180 is in fact, exposing consumers to more potential risk,” such as a breach of a home security alarm system.