California wants websites to prominently disclose privacy practices

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A new set of guidelines has been created in California to assist businesses in complying with the state privacy law that went into effect in January.

California Attorney General Kamala Harris's office created the guidelines in an effort to urge websites to directly state to site visitors how their privacy is being treated online, according to a recent report by The New York Times.

The recent legislation requires all sites to “prominently disclose” their privacy practices, as well as how businesses respond to consumers' “do-not-track” requests. While the guidelines are strictly voluntary, organizations that do not follow the recently enacted privacy law will receive 30-day warnings, prior to a possible lawsuit from the state.

While there are no laws binding website operators to honor do-not-track requests selected by users on browsers, many ignore notifications.

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