Despite security worries, 4 out of 5 pros pressured to roll out IT projects, study finds

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Watering hole attacks are becoming more difficult to detect and prevent.
On Wednesday, Trustwave published a global survey on pressures faced by security decision makers.

An overwhelming majority of decision makers are pressured to roll out IT projects that aren't “security ready,” a global survey found.

On Wednesday, Trustwave released its “2014 Security Pressures Report,” which showed that nearly 80 percent of respondents were pushed to back these projects in spite of reservations.

Trustwave, a Chicago-based data security and compliance firm, commissioned a third-party research firm to survey IT professionals for the 23-page report.

Around 830 full-time IT professionals, which included CIOs, CISOs, IT security directors and managers, were polled. More than 520 individuals were in the U.S., though others from the U.K., Germany and Canada responded to the email survey between Dec. 16, 2013 and Jan. 20.

Fifty percent of participants said that they felt the most pressure from their organization's owners, and other higher-ups, such as board members and C-level executives, the study found.

IT pros were also pushed to implement the newest offerings in security technology, despite not having the resources to effectively do so.

Of note, the study found that 1 out of 3 respondents lacked the proper resources to effectively use the technologies, even though they felt the pressure to choose and purchase products or services “with all the latest features.”

A large number, 85 percent of respondents, said that a bigger security team would help alleviate the pressures they faced and improve job effectiveness, the study said.

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