Hacktivists expose personal info of T-Mobile staff

Share this article:
T-Mobile was hit on Saturday with a hacktivist attack, which resulted in the publication of personal information of some 80 of the wireless communications provider's employees.

TeaMp0isoN, a splinter group of the Anonymous hacktivist collective, published the data – names, emails, phone numbers and passwords – on the Pastebin site, the usual depository for Anonymous-type exposures. The data was apparently stolen in October, based on date and time stamps on the posting.

At the bottom of the list – which shows that most of the T-Mobile employees have the same password, 112112 – TeaMp0isoN professed that the company's weak password management motivated its action:

"Look at the passwords, epic fail. All the passwords are manually given to staff via an admin who uses the same set of passwords," the group's statement reads.

In a report on Softpedia, the group also claimed it acted out of displeasure with the company's support of "the Big Brother Patriot Act law."

TeaMp0isoN, a group consisting of 10 or so hackers, according to its Facebook page, first emerged in 2009. It is apparently headed by a U.K.-based teenage hacker who identifies himself as "TriCk," and has claimed support for Pakistani and Muslim-based hacking groups. On ideological grounds, it has attacked the websites or exposed personal information of NASA, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Facebook, a number of U.S. government servers, BlackBerry, the United Nations, and even that of rival hacktivist group LulzSec.

"T-Mobile's newsroom experienced a security issue last week," a T-Mobile spokesperson said in a statement sent to SCMagazine.com on Tuesday. "No other online T-Mobile properties were affected. We've identified the root cause of the issue and security protocols have been updated. This issue did not impact T-Mobile customers."
 

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of SC Magazine to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

WikiLeaks makes FinFisher surveillance software available to public

Copies of controversial surveillance software, called "FinFisher," were made available for public scrutiny by WikiLeaks.

Researcher challenges reports that BlackPOS variant struck Home Depot

Nuix believes the malware found on Home Depot's systems belongs to a different threat family.

Documents reveal NSA plans to map every internet connected device in the ...

Documents provided by Edward Snowden reveal that the NSA is looking to build a near real-time map of every single internet-connected device in the world.