Let's just call it "The era of IT security"

This year has been marked by the almost daily occurrence of some information security-related incident or another. 

Frequent and massive data breaches have impacted millions of private citizens who have seen the theft or compromise of their personal information. Privacy and IT security pundits have been ever diligent railing against calls from the likes of the FBI to allow government and investigative entities to establish “backdoors” in encryption products and services. Hacktivists and other cyber vigilantes increasingly have targeted various groups and corporations. 

All the while, industry pros like you have trumpeted at length the growingly critical need to devise ways to entice more pros to enter the IT security field. You've voiced worries about IoT, cloud-based services and mobile device vulnerabilities. You've pointed out the ease with which insiders might aid in the compromise of corporate systems and intellectual property or other critical data. You've talked about point-of-sale compromises, credit card fraud, attacks on critical industrial control systems, you name it. At the same time, you've fretted about budget constraints and resources and staff, regularly marshalling business colleagues and CEOs for much-needed and sustained support.  

"...the impacts of cyberattacks of all kinds are getting personal."

2014's “year of the data breach” ushered in 2015 with such zeal that it now might as well be coined an era. Endless online attacks and vulnerabilities and threats now have garnered much more acute attention from the C-level suite down to their customers – some of whom, when IT security pros start talking bugs, are more likely to envision a dung beetle well before a software hole. 

With IT security concerns permeating every part of our lives every single day, the impacts of cyberattacks of all kinds are getting personal. And, those spearheading these assaults are bound to undertake still more and varied ways to steal data for financial gain, pinch intellectual property for competitive edge or leverage their activities to disrupt businesses with which they disagree or maybe to promote their group's messages to wider audiences. 

In this era of daily cyberattacks with varying motivations and outcomes, information security leaders like you will need to be even more strategic, continuing to make inroads to gain the required and widespread support from your colleagues and bosses to aid in the unremitting maturing of your organizations' security and risk management plans. And we'll continue to bring you insight from experts, well-researched and updated features and news, independent product reviews, more informational videos, robust online/live events, and even more varied content in the coming year to support you in this over-arching aim. 

So bring it on, 2016. We're prepped and ready.

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