Spy agency admits "incidental" interception of Canadians' information

Share this article:

In a striking departure from its traditional stance, the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSE) has admitted that it “may incidentally intercept Canadian communications or information” in the course of targeting foreign entities outside Canada.

The admission was included in a new section of the CSE's website, posted in late December. The agency – which is responsible for intercepting foreign communications, protecting Canadian data networks, and providing technical assistance to other law enforcement and security organizations – says the explanation was posted in response to increased media attention and public interest in the wake of disclosures by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

The statement also explains: “If a private communication is incidentally intercepted (e.g., a foreign individual we are targeting overseas is communicating with someone in Canada), CSE takes steps to protect the privacy of that information.”

Share this article:

THE LATEST ISSUE

Features

Archive of SC Magazine Canada

SC Magazine Canada

THE LATEST ISSUE

Features

Archive of SC Magazine Canada

SC Magazine Canada

More in SC Canada

Health law needs reform, says provincial privacy watchdog

The Albertan Information and Privacy Commissioner has formally asked the government to amend the province's Health Information Act with mandatory breach reporting and notification measures.

Well.ca security not that well, letter reveals

Well.ca, an online store selling health and beauty products, exposed names, addresses and credit card details for some of its customers in December, it admitted last month.

Canada signs Wedge Networks to secure government data centers

The Canadian government has hired Wedge Networks, a provider of cloud-based security services, to secure its computing infrastructure.