Anonymous DDoS attack snowballs, affects several Microsoft services

Share this article:

Hacktivist collective Anonymous has taken credit for an attack that unintentionally affected a number of Microsoft services last week.

On Monday, members of the loose-knit hacker group posted on Pastebin about how a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack targeting Japanese Microsoft websites and servers had gone awry – resulting in several of the technology giant's services going down.

“A couple days ago a DDoS attack was launched at Japanese Microsoft (Domain) Websites and Servers,” according to the Anonymous post. “We are sorry to report that the Japanese Microsoft Websites and Servers did not go down as planned. Although something did go down. We took the pretty much the entire Microsoft domains down.”

It appears the hackers had a motive.

“The DDoS attack was launched in response to Taiji...Operation Killing Bay OR #OpKillingBay,” according to the post. Operation Killing Bay is an initiative protesting the slaughter of dolphins in the village of Taiji in Japan – a controversial topic that has gained a lot of coverage in recent years.

“It's the thought that counts right?” the hacktivists wrote, insinuating that they would strike against Taiji again.

The claim explains why several people were reporting outages and disruptions of Microsoft services, including microsoft.com, outlook.com, msn.com, office365.com, Microsoft Developer Network, TechNet, SkyDrive, the Windows Store, sites hosted on Windows Azure, xbox.com and Xbox Live.

Most of Microsoft's affected services were restored quickly.

Share this article:
You must be a registered member of SC Magazine to post a comment.

Sign up to our newsletters

More in News

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

CryptoWall surpasses CryptoLocker in infection rates

A threat analysis from Dell SecureWorks CTU says that CryptoWall has picked up where its famous sibling left off.

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical info

Professor says Google search, not hacking, yielded medical ...

A professor of ethical hacking at City College San Francisco came forward to clarify that he did not demonstrate hacking a medical center's server in a class.

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm RAT

Syrian Malware Team makes use of enhanced BlackWorm ...

FireEye analyzed the hacking group's use of the malware, dubbed the "Dark Edition" of BlackWorm.