The CyberPeace Institute and dozens of international leaders and dignitaries on Tuesday collectively urged the world's governments in an open letter to help put an end to cyberattacks on hospitals and health care institutions that are already under the incredible strain of combatting the Covid-19 pandemic.

"Over the past weeks, we have witnessed attacks that have targeted medical facilities and organizations on the frontlines of the response to the Covid-19 pandemic," the letter states. "These actions have endangered human lives by impairing the ability of these critical institutions to function, slowing down the distribution of essential supplies and information, and disrupting the delivery of care to patients. With hundreds of thousands of people already perished and millions infected around the world, medical care is more important than ever."

Consequently, the letter's signatories are pleading with the world's governments to "work together, including at the United Nations, to reaffirm and recommit to international rules that prohibit such actions," while stating firmly that cyberattacks against healthcare organizations are illegal and intolerable. They are also asking nations to "join forces with civil society and the private sector, to ensure that medical facilities are respected and protected, and to hold perpetrators accountable."

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