SiliconAngle reports that German multinational engineering conglomerate ThyssenKrupp had its Materials Services division and corporate headquarters compromised by a cyberattack. While ThyssenKrupp did not disclose the type of attack, there has been no evidence suggesting any damage or data theft and modification as a result of the intrusion, which was immediately discovered and thwarted by its cybersecurity staff, according to a company spokesperson. The spokesperson added that the attack also did not impact other portions of the company. Such an attack signifies the growing threat of cyber incidents against industrial firms and the worldwide supply chain, said Xage Security CEO Duncan Greatwood. "In fact, cyber risks are now spreading from energy and utility sectors and making their way into the manufacturing sector such as steel manufacturing and heavy industries in an effort to cause massive chaos," said Greatwood, who added that accelerating preventive cybersecurity capability implementation should be prioritized to avert network compromise.