The act's name was inspired by a typo in middle-of-the-night tweet posted by Donald Trump.
The act's name was inspired by a typo in middle-of-the-night tweet posted by Donald Trump.

Donald Trump's tweets would be retained as official statements if the Covfefe Act, proposed Monday by Rep. Mike Quigley, D-Ill., becomes law.

An acronym of the an early typo tweeted by the president that quickly went viral, the Communications Over Various Feeds Electronically For Engagement (COVFEFE) Act, tackles a serious issue of how to classify social media communications by a president. It would amend the Presidential Records Act to include tweets, Facebook posts and other social media messaging.

“If the president is going to take to social media to make sudden public policy proclamations, we must ensure that these statements are documented and preserved for future reference,” Quigley said in a statement that noted the 14-character messages “are power, and the president must be held accountable for every post.”

Just last week, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer confirmed that Trump's tweets were “official statements by the president of the United States.”

If the COVFEFE Act becomes law, the president would be prevented from deleting messages.